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Mastering Dog Training: A Beginner's Guide to Building a Stronger Bond

Mastering Dog Training: A Beginner's Guide to Building a Stronger Bond

Mastering Dog Training: A Beginner's Guide to Building a Stronger Bond

Hey, there, paw-rent! Have you just brought home a new puppy? Maybe you just adopted an older dog, instead? Nevertheless, you already have a baby four-legs tottering around your home and it’s essential to foster a strong bond with them and ensure a loving and long-lasting relationship! Good thing you’re here! We’re about to give you the practical tips and techniques to help paw-rents like you become the best fur-carer ever!

Benefits of Dog Training for Beginners:

Before we get into it, let’s figure out why it’s important to train your dogs – and the best voice for that comes from the Winnipeg Human Society who said that investing into dog training gives owners an opportunity to enhance communication, strengthen bonds and promotes desirable behaviors. That’s more than just teaching them cute tricks – and even more so that training your dog creates a safer environment for both the paw-rent and pet as they become more manageable in various situations.

 

dog training

 

Understanding Your Dog's Behavior:

Now that we know that there is only good that can come out of training your dog, it’s time to understand them! It’s incredibly important to understand your dog’s behavior and instincts. Since they can’t speak, they communicate only through body language and as their carer, you need to pay attention to their subtle cues so it’ll be easier to understand what they want and how they feel.

With the American Kennel Club, here are some examples of common body language signals and what they may indicate:

Tail Wagging: First, it’s tail wagging! Now a lot of people may think that as long as their tail is wagging, it means they’re happy. That’s not always the case! It really depends on how high the tail is wagging, how stiff the tail itself and even how fast they’re wagging it! To paint a better picture, here are some different kinds of tail wagging and it’s associated emotion:

  • A broad, loose wag with a relaxed body suggests a happy and friendly demeanor.
  • A stiff, high wag with a tense body may indicate agitation or arousal.
  • A low, slow wag with a tucked tail could signal fear or submission.

Ears: Second, it’s their ears. Similar to their tail wagging, there are certain kinds and versions that convey different emotions and reactions. Here are some of them:

  • Erect ears facing forward indicate attentiveness or curiosity.
  • Ears flattened against the head suggest fear, anxiety, or submission.
  • One ear forward and one ear back may indicate uncertainty or alertness.

Body Posture: Third is the body posture. Similar to us humans, we convey different emotions or states through body language. For example, when people are feeling closed off, we cross our arms. Dogs do that too! Here are some signs you can watch out for:

  • A relaxed, loose body posture with a wagging tail indicates friendliness and confidence.
  • Stiff, tense muscles and a rigid body suggest discomfort, fear, or aggression.
  • Rolling onto their back with exposed belly can be a sign of submission or trust, but it may also signal fear if accompanied by other submissive behaviors like lip licking or avoiding eye contact.

Facial Expressions: Then, we have facial expressions! Dogs use their eyes, ears, nose and even brows to communicate their emotions further just like these examples:

  • Soft, relaxed eyes with a slightly open mouth convey calmness and contentment.
  • Wide eyes with dilated pupils may indicate fear or stress.
  • Lips pulled back in a snarl or showing teeth signals aggression or discomfort.

Vocalizations: Voice is involved too! They way dogs use their vocal chords can also inform you of their needs. For example:

  • Barking or growling can indicate excitement, alertness, fear, or aggression, depending on the context and tone.
  • Whining or whimpering may signify anxiety, discomfort, or a desire for attention.
  • Howling can be a form of communication or a response to certain stimuli, such as sirens or other dogs.

If you’ve read this and thought they all seemed obvious, don’t sweat it! They might be common behaviors but it’s hard to decipher them to the untrained eye. The more you look out for these things, the more you’ll understand your dog’s behavior and overall personality. Through this, it’ll provide a better avenue of communication between the both of you – eventually leading to a stronger bond.

Common Behavioural Issues in Dogs:

More than knowing their behavioral actions, it’s also important to understand common behavioral issues too! While they are referred to as issues, they’re not to be seen as incredibly negative, They are to be seen as areas of improvement with your dog. Here are some of them:

Separation Anxiety: First, it’s separation anxiety. It’s a condition that both humans and dogs experience. It’s a type of distress caused by being separated from their owners or left alone in their homes. Some symptoms to look out for are house soiling and attempts to escape. In order to manage it, it’s important to slowly get your dog used to being alone as well as train them coping mechanisms such as creating and sticking to a routine and providing mental stimulation through toys and puzzles.

Excessive Barking: Another common behavioral issue is excessive barking. There are various causes that trigger this such as boredom, fear, territorial instincts or seeking attention. While these can be seen as behavioral actions in a different context, it’s also important to pay more attention to when it becomes excessive as it might indicate something wrong going on. When this happens, it’s important to teach them alternative behaviors through commands such as “quiet” or “speak”. You can also reward their periods of silence with a treat, or if you really want to get to the root of it – identify and address the cause. Some common causes are environmental and social factors.

Leash Pulling: Finally, leash pulling is another common issue with dogs. It often occurs during walks and they can pull on the leash due to excitement, lack of manners and maybe just a plain desire to explore their surroundings. There are training techniques to address this as well such as positive reinforcement during dog training.

Creating a Positive Training Environment:

After identifying common behavioral actions and issues, it’s time to figure out how to create a positive training environment. Creating such an environment requires work but dog parents can begin by creating a quiet and distraction-free space at home so that when you do conduct trainings within the comfort of your four walls, the dog can focus and learn rather quickly. Additionally, keep these training sessions short and enjoyable – and don’t forget to reward them with their favorite treats and toys after!

jugbow dog collar

It’s also important to remember that consistency is key – even when it concerns you creating and maintaining a positive environment for dog training. Make sure that the rules and expectations you’ve set are consistently enforced and met as it helps your dog get used to it, and eventually emulate it naturally. Leave room for grace and patience when things don’t go your way and avoid punishing them harshly as it may change their perspective of you – even as worse as the dog losing their trust and love for you. 

How to Train Dogs:

Now, on to the good part! It’s time to learn how to train your dog! Now that you know how essential it is to give out positive reinforcement and ensure the safety and well-being of your dog which includes the responsible use of dog training collars. When people encounter a dog training collar, it becomes fairly easy to misuse and even abuse it.

jugbow collar

We are not here to let you do that. It’s important to use this collar in the most careful and responsible way that’s why here are some dog training techniques and how to do them with this collar while assuring there is good use and positive reinforcement all the time:

Sit Command:

  • Begin by holding a treat in your hand and guiding it above your dog's nose.
  • Slowly move the treat back towards your dog's tail, encouraging them to follow it with their gaze.
  • As your dog's head tilts up and back, their bottom naturally lowers towards the ground.
  • As soon as their bottom touches the ground, praise them enthusiastically and offer the treat as a reward.
  • If your dog struggles to understand the command, gently guide their bottom down while saying "sit" and then reward them.
  • Incorporate the use of the training collar by attaching it securely and adjusting it to the appropriate fit. Use the collar to provide gentle cues or corrections if needed, ensuring to pair it with verbal commands and positive reinforcement.

Stay Command:

  • Start by commanding your dog to sit or lie down.
  • Hold your hand up, palm facing your dog, and say "stay" in a calm but firm tone.
  • Take a step or two back while maintaining eye contact with your dog.
  • If your dog remains in place, praise them and offer a treat as a reward.
  • If your dog starts to move, use the training collar to provide a gentle reminder to stay in place, ensuring to release pressure once they comply.

Come Command:

  • Begin in a low-distraction environment, such as your backyard or a quiet room indoors.
  • Call your dog's name followed by the command "come" in an upbeat and inviting tone.
  • Use a hand gesture or pat your legs to encourage your dog to approach you.
  • When your dog comes to you, praise them enthusiastically and offer a high-value treat as a reward.
  • If your dog hesitates or gets distracted, use the training collar to provide gentle guidance towards you, reinforcing the command with positive reinforcement.

Heel Command:

  • Start with your dog in a sitting position on your left side.
  • Hold a treat in your left hand and encourage your dog to walk beside you.
  • Use the command "heel" and begin walking slowly, keeping your dog's attention focused on you.
  • If your dog starts to pull ahead or lag behind, gently guide them back into position using the training collar, rewarding them when they comply.
  • Practice short sessions of heeling in different environments, gradually increasing the duration and difficulty as your dog improves.

Socialization Tips:

It doesn’t end there. It’s important to consider socialization as well. It’s crucial because it shapes a well-adjusted and confident dog. Expose your dog to a variety of people, animals, sounds and environment as soon as possible. Take it slow as well by introducing them in safe and supervised settings first and gradually increase the level of exposure over time and until your dog becomes comfortable.

Additionally, don’t forget to encourage your dog to greet others and play with fellow pups in a friendly manner. Watch out for those common behavioral actions so that in the event your dog feels uncomfortable and unsafe, you can intervene and help them manage and overcome. 

Handling Behavioral Challenges:

Now, all of this may sound so good, so far – but training your dog does not come without its challenges. With patience and perseverance, you can overcome daily issues and challenges effectively so don’t give up just because times get hard. Just take a breath and try again tomorrow, if need be!

Keep in mind that these issues and challenges have a root cause so definitely take the time to understand the situation, identify the root cause and figure out strategies to resolve them. For example, if leash pulling is an issue – maybe loosening up the wear around the dog’s neck can do the trick or if not, then using other forms of leashes like front-clip harnesses or head halters can be a good alternative.

Training Tools and Resources:

There is always room for additional help and there are training tools and resources that you can use to your advantage when training your dog. One such tool is the aforementioned dog training collar. When used well and properly, it can provide a gentle correction during dog training sessions. Along with positive reinforcement, it can reinforce desired behaviors and deter the not so desirable ones.

Before getting into using the dog training collar, it is incredibly important to learn its features and how to operate it to ensure a safe and humane experience. Ensure to start with the lowest level and pay strict attention to your dog’s response before adjusting it. Remember, the dog training collar is supposed to help them – not scare them.

Conclusion

With all that you’ve read, remember that as you embark on this journey of dog training, remember to be patient, consistent and empathetic as you understand their behavior, create a positive environment and teach dog training techniques. Enjoy every single moment and don’t be so hard on yourself and your dog. Cherish the bond you’re about to make with your furry friend!

Ready to unleash your dog's full potential? Join our community of dedicated pet owners committed to nurturing well-behaved and happy dogs!

Mastering Dog Training: A Beginner's Guide to Building a Stronger Bond

Hey, there, paw-rent! Have you just brought home a new puppy? Maybe you just adopted an older dog, instead? Nevertheless, you already have a baby four-legs tottering around your home and it’s essential to foster a strong bond with them and ensure a loving and long-lasting relationship! Good thing you’re here! We’re about to give you the practical tips and techniques to help paw-rents like you become the best fur-carer ever!

Benefits of Dog Training for Beginners:

Before we get into it, let’s figure out why it’s important to train your dogs – and the best voice for that comes from the Winnipeg Human Society who said that investing into dog training gives owners an opportunity to enhance communication, strengthen bonds and promotes desirable behaviors. That’s more than just teaching them cute tricks – and even more so that training your dog creates a safer environment for both the paw-rent and pet as they become more manageable in various situations.

Understanding Your Dog's Behavior:

Now that we know that there is only good that can come out of training your dog, it’s time to understand them! It’s incredibly important to understand your dog’s behavior and instincts. Since they can’t speak, they communicate only through body language and as their carer, you need to pay attention to their subtle cues so it’ll be easier to understand what they want and how they feel.

With the American Kennel Club, here are some examples of common body language signals and what they may indicate:

Tail Wagging: First, it’s tail wagging! Now a lot of people may think that as long as their tail is wagging, it means they’re happy. That’s not always the case! It really depends on how high the tail is wagging, how stiff the tail itself and even how fast they’re wagging it! To paint a better picture, here are some different kinds of tail wagging and it’s associated emotion:

  • A broad, loose wag with a relaxed body suggests a happy and friendly demeanor.
  • A stiff, high wag with a tense body may indicate agitation or arousal.
  • A low, slow wag with a tucked tail could signal fear or submission.

Ears: Second, it’s their ears. Similar to their tail wagging, there are certain kinds and versions that convey different emotions and reactions. Here are some of them:

  • Erect ears facing forward indicate attentiveness or curiosity.
  • Ears flattened against the head suggest fear, anxiety, or submission.
  • One ear forward and one ear back may indicate uncertainty or alertness.

Body Posture: Third is the body posture. Similar to us humans, we convey different emotions or states through body language. For example, when people are feeling closed off, we cross our arms. Dogs do that too! Here are some signs you can watch out for:

  • A relaxed, loose body posture with a wagging tail indicates friendliness and confidence.
  • Stiff, tense muscles and a rigid body suggest discomfort, fear, or aggression.
  • Rolling onto their back with exposed belly can be a sign of submission or trust, but it may also signal fear if accompanied by other submissive behaviors like lip licking or avoiding eye contact.

Facial Expressions: Then, we have facial expressions! Dogs use their eyes, ears, nose and even brows to communicate their emotions further just like these examples:

  • Soft, relaxed eyes with a slightly open mouth convey calmness and contentment.
  • Wide eyes with dilated pupils may indicate fear or stress.
  • Lips pulled back in a snarl or showing teeth signals aggression or discomfort.

Vocalizations: Voice is involved too! They way dogs use their vocal chords can also inform you of their needs. For example:

  • Barking or growling can indicate excitement, alertness, fear, or aggression, depending on the context and tone.
  • Whining or whimpering may signify anxiety, discomfort, or a desire for attention.
  • Howling can be a form of communication or a response to certain stimuli, such as sirens or other dogs.

If you’ve read this and thought they all seemed obvious, don’t sweat it! They might be common behaviors but it’s hard to decipher them to the untrained eye. The more you look out for these things, the more you’ll understand your dog’s behavior and overall personality. Through this, it’ll provide a better avenue of communication between the both of you – eventually leading to a stronger bond.

Common Behavioural Issues in Dogs:

More than knowing their behavioral actions, it’s also important to understand common behavioral issues too! While they are referred to as issues, they’re not to be seen as incredibly negative, They are to be seen as areas of improvement with your dog. Here are some of them:

Separation Anxiety: First, it’s separation anxiety. It’s a condition that both humans and dogs experience. It’s a type of distress caused by being separated from their owners or left alone in their homes. Some symptoms to look out for are house soiling and attempts to escape. In order to manage it, it’s important to slowly get your dog used to being alone as well as train them coping mechanisms such as creating and sticking to a routine and providing mental stimulation through toys and puzzles.

Excessive Barking: Another common behavioral issue is excessive barking. There are various causes that trigger this such as boredom, fear, territorial instincts or seeking attention. While these can be seen as behavioral actions in a different context, it’s also important to pay more attention to when it becomes excessive as it might indicate something wrong going on. When this happens, it’s important to teach them alternative behaviors through commands such as “quiet” or “speak”. You can also reward their periods of silence with a treat, or if you really want to get to the root of it – identify and address the cause. Some common causes are environmental and social factors.

Leash Pulling: Finally, leash pulling is another common issue with dogs. It often occurs during walks and they can pull on the leash due to excitement, lack of manners and maybe just a plain desire to explore their surroundings. There are training techniques to address this as well such as positive reinforcement during dog training.

Creating a Positive Training Environment:

After identifying common behavioral actions and issues, it’s time to figure out how to create a positive training environment. Creating such an environment requires work but dog parents can begin by creating a quiet and distraction-free space at home so that when you do conduct trainings within the comfort of your four walls, the dog can focus and learn rather quickly. Additionally, keep these training sessions short and enjoyable – and don’t forget to reward them with their favorite treats and toys after!

It’s also important to remember that consistency is key – even when it concerns you creating and maintaining a positive environment for dog training. Make sure that the rules and expectations you’ve set are consistently enforced and met as it helps your dog get used to it, and eventually emulate it naturally. Leave room for grace and patience when things don’t go your way and avoid punishing them harshly as it may change their perspective of you – even as worse as the dog losing their trust and love for you. 

How to Train Dogs:

Now, on to the good part! It’s time to learn how to train your dog! Now that you know how essential it is to give out positive reinforcement and ensure the safety and well-being of your dog which includes the responsible use of dog training collars. When people encounter a dog training collar, it becomes fairly easy to misuse and even abuse it. We are not here to let you do that. It’s important to use this collar in the most careful and responsible way that’s why here are some dog training techniques and how to do them with this collar while assuring there is good use and positive reinforcement all the time:

Sit Command:

  • Begin by holding a treat in your hand and guiding it above your dog's nose.
  • Slowly move the treat back towards your dog's tail, encouraging them to follow it with their gaze.
  • As your dog's head tilts up and back, their bottom naturally lowers towards the ground.
  • As soon as their bottom touches the ground, praise them enthusiastically and offer the treat as a reward.
  • If your dog struggles to understand the command, gently guide their bottom down while saying "sit" and then reward them.
  • Incorporate the use of the training collar by attaching it securely and adjusting it to the appropriate fit. Use the collar to provide gentle cues or corrections if needed, ensuring to pair it with verbal commands and positive reinforcement.

Stay Command:

  • Start by commanding your dog to sit or lie down.
  • Hold your hand up, palm facing your dog, and say "stay" in a calm but firm tone.
  • Take a step or two back while maintaining eye contact with your dog.
  • If your dog remains in place, praise them and offer a treat as a reward.
  • If your dog starts to move, use the training collar to provide a gentle reminder to stay in place, ensuring to release pressure once they comply.

Come Command:

  • Begin in a low-distraction environment, such as your backyard or a quiet room indoors.
  • Call your dog's name followed by the command "come" in an upbeat and inviting tone.
  • Use a hand gesture or pat your legs to encourage your dog to approach you.
  • When your dog comes to you, praise them enthusiastically and offer a high-value treat as a reward.
  • If your dog hesitates or gets distracted, use the training collar to provide gentle guidance towards you, reinforcing the command with positive reinforcement.

Heel Command:

  • Start with your dog in a sitting position on your left side.
  • Hold a treat in your left hand and encourage your dog to walk beside you.
  • Use the command "heel" and begin walking slowly, keeping your dog's attention focused on you.
  • If your dog starts to pull ahead or lag behind, gently guide them back into position using the training collar, rewarding them when they comply.
  • Practice short sessions of heeling in different environments, gradually increasing the duration and difficulty as your dog improves.

Socialization Tips:

It doesn’t end there. It’s important to consider socialization as well. It’s crucial because it shapes a well-adjusted and confident dog. Expose your dog to a variety of people, animals, sounds and environment as soon as possible. Take it slow as well by introducing them in safe and supervised settings first and gradually increase the level of exposure over time and until your dog becomes comfortable.

Additionally, don’t forget to encourage your dog to greet others and play with fellow pups in a friendly manner. Watch out for those common behavioral actions so that in the event your dog feels uncomfortable and unsafe, you can intervene and help them manage and overcome. 

Handling Behavioral Challenges:

Now, all of this may sound so good, so far – but training your dog does not come without its challenges. With patience and perseverance, you can overcome daily issues and challenges effectively so don’t give up just because times get hard. Just take a breath and try again tomorrow, if need be!

Keep in mind that these issues and challenges have a root cause so definitely take the time to understand the situation, identify the root cause and figure out strategies to resolve them. For example, if leash pulling is an issue – maybe loosening up the wear around the dog’s neck can do the trick or if not, then using other forms of leashes like front-clip harnesses or head halters can be a good alternative.

Training Tools and Resources:

There is always room for additional help and there are training tools and resources that you can use to your advantage when training your dog. One such tool is the aforementioned dog training collar. When used well and properly, it can provide a gentle correction during dog training sessions. Along with positive reinforcement, it can reinforce desired behaviors and deter the not so desirable ones.

Before getting into using the dog training collar, it is incredibly important to learn its features and how to operate it to ensure a safe and humane experience. Ensure to start with the lowest level and pay strict attention to your dog’s response before adjusting it. Remember, the dog training collar is supposed to help them – not scare them.

Conclusion

With all that you’ve read, remember that as you embark on this journey of dog training, remember to be patient, consistent and empathetic as you understand their behavior, create a positive environment and teach dog training techniques. Enjoy every single moment and don’t be so hard on yourself and your dog. Cherish the bond you’re about to make with your furry friend!

Ready to unleash your dog's full potential? Join our community of dedicated pet owners committed to nurturing well-behaved and happy dogs!

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